• Aperture: ƒ/11
  • Camera: NIKON D700
  • Taken: 12 November, 2012 12:29
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 250
  • Shutter speed: 1/640 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/22
  • Camera: NIKON D700
  • Taken: 12 November, 2012 12:34
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 640
  • Shutter speed: 1/800 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/16
  • Camera: NIKON D700
  • Taken: 12 November, 2012 12:29
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 250
  • Shutter speed: 1/1000 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/11
  • Camera: NIKON D700
  • Taken: 12 November, 2012 12:29
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 250
  • Shutter speed: 1/640 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/22
  • Camera: NIKON D700
  • Taken: 12 November, 2012 12:34
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 640
  • Shutter speed: 1/800 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/11
  • Camera: NIKON D700
  • Taken: 12 November, 2012 12:29
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 250
  • Shutter speed: 1/640 s

Most will think this is a moss, but it’s a very slow-growing perennial that can grow to huge individuals. It grows less than 2 cm per year, so the largest individuals are several thousand years of age!

During flowering there are huge amount of insects drawn to the sticky, sweet resin from the flowers. Even humans will have a pleasant experience as they smell really sweet.

Yareta (Azorella compacta)
Old individuals might suddenly shed big portions of the growth as seen here. I don’t know if it’s insects, larvae or disease that causes this, but I guess that when you’ve been growing for a couple of thousand years, there might be certain areas of the plant that is simply too hard to maintain, and thus it’s simply dropped – like a dead branch on a tree.

Yareta (Azorella compacta)
From a distance the wonderful Yaretas seems uniformly green, but not so, as seen here.

Yareta (Azorella compacta)

Altitude: 4345 metres.

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