• Aperture: ƒ/7.1
  • Camera: NIKON D4S
  • Taken: 5 May, 2019 13:09
  • Focal length: 135mm
  • ISO: 900
  • Shutter speed: 1/500 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: NIKON D4S
  • Taken: 5 May, 2019 13:09
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 360
  • Shutter speed: 1/400 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/7.1
  • Camera: NIKON D4S
  • Taken: 5 May, 2019 13:09
  • Focal length: 185mm
  • ISO: 2200
  • Shutter speed: 1/500 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/7.1
  • Camera: NIKON D4S
  • Taken: 5 May, 2019 13:09
  • Focal length: 135mm
  • ISO: 900
  • Shutter speed: 1/500 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: NIKON D4S
  • Taken: 5 May, 2019 13:09
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 360
  • Shutter speed: 1/400 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/7.1
  • Camera: NIKON D4S
  • Taken: 5 May, 2019 13:09
  • Focal length: 135mm
  • ISO: 900
  • Shutter speed: 1/500 s

In many places the various species of wallabies have become so used to humans that they come out and up close to check you out. As they are herbivores I find it quite interesting why they chose to come up close to humans. Perhaps some humans do hand out irresistible plant materials, or some have come to like something only humans can provide. I guess I would need to stay a bit longer on Tasmania to figure that one out.

Red-necked Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus)

Red-necked Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus)

Red-necked Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus)

  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: NIKON D4S
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 360
  • Shutter speed: 1/400 s

Related Photos

No related posts.