Tag Archives: Iguaçu National Park

Green Kingfisher (Chloroceryle americana)

Once this was a river (or part of Iguaçu), but debris and silt from a great flood closed it off to form this lake. The lake is just a few metres away from the mighty Iguaçu river, so the lake could once again change into a river if Iguaçu wants to. This lake is teaming […]

Iguaçu Grasshopper 02

One of several species of grasshoppers seen around the falls. Please help me identify it – leave a comment.

Iguaçu Grasshopper 01

One of several species of grasshoppers seen around the falls. Please help me identify it – leave a comment.

Amazon Lava Lizard (Tropidurus torquatus)

These lizards were common alongside the path following the Iguaçu Falls. If you’re alone and don’t move around too much, they will usually come out for a close-up. This is usually only possible when the park is closed, or if you stay behind the large groups of visitors.

Great Dusky Swift (Cypseloides senex)

The color of the swifts match that of the rocks they cling to, so unless you know what to look for you’ll most likely pass by focused as you are on the magnificent falls. A few of the swifts build nests in “accessible” places like this – accessible by sight that is. They are perhaps […]

Great Dusky Swift (Cypseloides senex)

These swifts are impervious to the force of the water as well as being able to stay dry whatever the conditions. Here they are flying in and out of their nests inside the dense and very wet vegetation that cling on to the cracks between and underneath the waterfalls. Others simply nest under the waterfalls […]

Iguaçu Falls (Cataratas do Iguaçu)

Iguaçu Falls is impressive in daylight, but in a moonlit setting like this it’s simply something you’ll never forget! The Moon is high on the right, and Venus is the bright star. The mist from the falls sometimes clogged up so much that it seemed completely cloudy, only to be completely gone a few minutes […]

Iguaçu National Park

This park is huge, but only a tiny fraction is open to public, one of which is the Hotel das Cataratas. For those who want to see the splendor of this park with as few people around as possible, this is the only way. If you stay outside the park, you can only enter from […]

Bat Falcon (Falco rufigularis)

One great way to see wildlife is to use rivers, and Iguaçu is no exception. This falcon I saw on my way to an island where large numbers of parrots roost every night.

Surucua Trogon (Trogon surrucura)

Trogons can sometimes be very difficult to see, as they can sit quitely on the same spot for long periods, only slowly moving its head to look for insects or danger. Ths section was also very dark – the setting sun did not reach here, so I only saw a dark silhouette. As I moved […]

Broad-Snouted Caiman (Caiman latirostris)

Where there’s water there’s a caiman, and where there’s a caiman there’s a multitude of insects. Here a benign glittering sapphire (Lasaia agesilas) sits on it like a decoration while it’s sucking fluids from its eye. There are two species here in Iguacu National Park, the other is jacare. The broad-snouted is distinguished by the […]

Salpensa Sailor (Dynamine tithia salpensa)

There is a 9 km long trail (Poco Preto trail) from the main road that leads to the Iguaçu river, and for me it was butterfly heaven as I saw so many different species and in places also in groups. Thanks to Kim Garwood for identification.

Ithra Crescent (Ortilia ithra)

There is a 9 km long trail (Poco Preto trail) from the main road that leads to the Iguaçu river, and for me it was butterfly heaven as I saw so many different species and in places also in groups. Thanks to Kim Garwood for identification.

Emesis sp

There is a 9 km long trail (Poco Preto trail) from the main road that leads to the Iguaçu river, and for me it was butterfly heaven as I saw so many different species and in places also in groups.

Lansdorf’s Crescent (Eresia lansdorfi)

There is a 9 km long trail (Poco Preto trail) from the main road that leads to the Iguaçu river, and for me it was butterfly heaven as I saw so many different species and in places also in groups.

Cat’s-eye Sapphire (Lasaia arsis)

There is a 9 km long trail (Poco Preto trail) from the main road that leads to the Iguaçu river, and for me it was butterfly heaven as I saw so many different species and in places also in groups.

Many-banded Daggerwing (Marpesia chiron)

There is a 9 km long trail (Poco Preto trail) from the main road that leads to the Iguaçu river, and for me it was butterfly heaven as I saw so many different species and in places also in groups.

Theodora Metalmark (Chalodeta theodora)

There is a 9 km long trail (Poco Preto trail) from the main road that leads to the Iguaçu river, and for me it was butterfly heaven as I saw so many different species and in places also in groups.

Basilis Metalmark (Barbicornis basilis)

There is a 9 km long trail (Poco Preto trail) from the main road that leads to the Iguaçu river, and for me it was butterfly heaven as I saw so many different species and in places also in groups. Thanks to Kim Garwood for identification.

Iguaçu Moth 01

I didn’t have time exploring the nightlife during my stay inside the park, but this is one of a few I found resting during my diurnal activities. Please help me identify it – leave a comment 🙂

Iguaçu Beetle (Chrysina sp)

A brief encounter of one of countless insect species in this magnificent park. Please help me identify it – leave a comment 🙂

Great Dusky Swift (Cypseloides senex)

These swifts seem to be untouched by the laws of physics. They move in and out of the raging falls as if it’s air, and fly as close to the water as possible. I wonder what kind of insects they catch this close to the falls?

Great Dusky Swift (Cypseloides senex)

Black vultures are large and seen all the time around the falls – either surfing the updrafts or simply lounging on treetops or outcrops. The swifts are the second prominent species here, albeit for only a few months of the year opposed to the vultures that reside here throughout the year. The swifts come here […]

Leopard Moth (Pantherodes pardalis)

A striking moth that definitely does not blend with the surroundings. It rests here alongside the trail down the Iguaçu Falls.

Epinome Cracker (Hamadryas epinome)

This is the second member of the Hamadryas genus I saw here in Iguaçu National Park.

Iguaçu Falls (Cataratas do Iguaçu)

This awesome sight is only available to those staying at the hotel inside the park (Hotel Das Cataratas), as the park closes all access long before sunset! It’s amazing to stay out here after sunset, as there are hardly anyone else here to see this!

Candrena Eighty-eight (Diaethria candrena)

Yet another of the numberwings sucking human salt off the railings alongside the trails down Iguaçu Falls

Nine-Banded Armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus)

During the hours between 18:00 and 09:00 when the Iguaçu National Park on the Brazilian side is closed, and only guests of the Hotel das Catarates have access, you will most likely see a lot more of the local fauna. This armadillo was foraging alongside the path following the falls.

Argentine Giant Tegu (Tupinambis merianae)

This large lizard is very common alongside the path following the Iguaçu Falls. With gentle movements you can get quite close to them as I did with this one basking in the heat of the setting sun. Also called Argentine black and white tegu.

Red Cracker (Hamadryas amphinome)

Alongside the trails leading down to the Devil’s Throat of Iguaçu Falls I saw several species of butterflies I have not seen before, and this one was the only one of this species during my three days here. Common to all butterflies was the tempting human salt left from sweaty palms on the railings and […]

Hydaspes Eighty-eight (Callicore hydaspes)

When you first see a numberwing butterfly or eighty-eights, you are oblivious to the intricacies of the way the number is the patterns are, and think you see the same species all the time. But not so! I saw three species alongside the Iguaçu Falls trails on the Brazilian side and this is the first […]

False Numberwing (Paulogramma pyracmon)

This is the third of the numberwings I observed around Iguaçu Falls on the Brazilian side. This one also busy licking salt from all the sweaty human hands sliding down the railings.

Orb weaver (Alpaida sp)

The path alongside the Iguaçu Falls are great for observing insects, and this spider species was numerous and extremely busy mending webs or creating new ones.

Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus)

There are two prominent species of birds around Iguaçu Falls, one being the common black vulture. You’ll see it in groups lounging in treetops, or simply surfing the thermals to check for easy pickings.

Iguaçu Falls (Cataratas do Iguaçu)

It’s very hard not to say wow out loud when you see and hear the falls for the first time! When the sun is in the east up to zenith, the mist is not so prominent as the light moves from my point of view. But when the sun is moving ever closer to the […]