Archive for 'Butterflies'

Bicyclus anynana socotrana

A bird has likely tried to eat it, and thus a part of the hind wing was lost. This was only one of the species I encountered, so this imperfect specimen must do.

Glass-Tip Acraea (Acraea neobule socotrana)

There are many species of butterflies on Socotra, and in some areas you can see many of them if there are plenty of plants in bloom. At higher elevations – about 800 meters and higher, the euryops arabicus thrives, so when in bloom the butterflies have a lot of food from the thousands of flowers. […]

African migrant (Catopsilia florella)

This was the first of many species of butterflies I encountered on Socotra, and here I found at least 6 males of Catopsilia florella. I find the male rather dull compared to the female, but that is my view – the female definitely selects a male with a green hue. Here it’s finding food in […]

African migrant (Catopsilia florella)

The female of the species I encountered around the mangrove forest on Shuab beach of west Socotra. As long as the endemic Limonium sokotranum is in bloom the butterflies have plenty of food as they are very common here.

Long-tailed Skipper (Urbanus proteus)

There are a few access roads to the Rio Las Piedras which is the only way to the Amazon Research and Conservation Center (ARCC), and on my way back we chose to drive the one that is the shortest way from ARCC, but is longer on land. This cause some problems when there have been […]

Veined White Skipper (Heliopetes arsalte)

There are a few access roads to the Rio Las Piedras which is the only way to the Amazon Research and Conservation Center (ARCC), and on my way back we chose to drive the one that is the shortest way from ARCC, but is longer on land. This cause some problems when there have been […]

Orcus Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus orcus)

There are a few access roads to the Rio Las Piedras which is the only way to the Amazon Research and Conservation Center (ARCC), and on my way back we chose to drive the one that is the shortest way from ARCC, but is longer on land. This cause some problems when there have been […]

Eumaeus minyas

I found many butterflies around the dark forest floor of the forest surrounding the Amazon Research and Conservation Center (ARCC). Some so well camouflaged that I couldn’t see them unless they moved of was in flight. This one was one of several exceptions, as its bright spots make it somewhat conspicuous. Thanks to Kim Garwood […]

Rainbow Metalmark (Caria trochilus)

A large tree had fallen down, and under the root a small pond had formed. This together with a cone of light where the canopy of the fallen tree once was, I found so many interesting insects that had found this temporary opportunity in the forest surrounding the Amazon Research and Conservation Center (ARCC) in […]

ARCC lepidoptera 04 (Caeruleuptychia sp)

There are many trails around Amazon Research and Conservation Center (ARCC), and although many find the forest dark and lifeless compared to the canopy, you only need to take it slow, and you’ll see how it’s teeming with life. On just one point of one of the trails I found many species of butterflies. Most […]

Pythonides grandes

I found many butterflies around the dark forest floor of the forest surrounding the Amazon Research and Conservation Center (ARCC). Many are so well camouflaged that they are invisible when the rest on leaf litter. Some, like this one, are very visible when they sit in the few rays of sunlight passing through the canopy […]

ARCC lepidoptera 02

I found many butterflies around the dark forest floor of the forest surrounding the Amazon Research and Conservation Center (ARCC). Many are so well camouflaged that they are invisible when they rest on leaf litter. It’s even also hard to see when when it’s sitting on fresh leaves, as the background is leaf litter and […]

Pierella lena

I found many butterflies around the dark forest floor of the forest surrounding the Amazon Research and Conservation Center (ARCC). Many are so well camouflaged that they are invisible when they rest on leaf litter. Thanks to Kim Garwood for ID confirmation.

Blue-banded Morpho (Morpho achilles)

Morphos are mesmerizing! In flight you see the flash of blue, but when they sit they’re invisible as they almost never open the wings and the underside is like the surroundings of its environment – the dark and dappled forest floor. This individual is old and torn, perhaps somewhat confused as it’s sitting with open […]

Queen (Danaus gilippus)

A truly amazing butterfly, and as I recall the only one of the species I encountered here at SouthWild Pantanal. Here it’s visiting a plant growing alongside the SouthWild Pantanal’s dirt road – just a couple of hundred metres away from the buildings.

Thoasa Sister (Adelpha thoasa)

Another species in the Adelpha genus! Some are very hard to identify as the patterns look very similar, but this of the easy ones. I encountered it as I was photographing the many wonderful flower species in bloom here at Southwild Pantanal.

Julia (Dryas iulia)

This butterfly turned up as I was photographing flowers alongside one of the trails around SouthWild Pantanal.

Eurema agave

Sitting on an inflorescense on a sandbank of the river Cuiaba upriver from Porto Jofre.

Common Spurwing (Antigonus erosus)

In some areas by the rivers and under fruiting trees I found plenty of individuals from this species, and when they are still they can be hard to see. This one is from under a fruiting tree in a farm (fazenda) far upstream from Porto Jofre.

Lysippus Metalmark (Riodina lysippus)

I visited Pantanal just as the rainy season was beginning, and the rivers still not covering the sandbanks. Thus I could enjoy all the different kinds of insect and butterflies. This was one of many, many species I encountered.

Gray Cracker (Hamadryas februa)

On a tree not far from the Cuiaba river in Porto Jofre I saw several species of crackers in the typical upside down posture. You rarely see them up close or on the ground, so sometimes a long lens is the only way to get a decent shot. The name cracker is based on the […]

Variable Cracker (Hamadryas feronia)

On a tree not far from the Cuiaba river in Porto Jofre I saw several species of crackers in the typical upside down posture. You rarely see them up close or on the ground, so sometimes a long lens is the only way to get a decent shot. The name cracker is based on the […]

Velutina Cracker (Hamadryas velutina)

On a tree not far from the Cuiaba river in Porto Jofre I saw several species of crackers in the typical upside down posture. This however is my first of this particular species, and is a real beauty. You rarely see them up close or on the ground, so sometimes a long lens is the […]

Hairstreak (Ziegleria azia)

Yet another interesting species I found on the many sandbanks – some locations I found them in groups like here. It’s very small but beautiful genus in the Lycaenidae family, and should perhaps be easy to identify, but these patterns are so minutely different in each species, that it’s like reading barcode. This is a […]

Flamingo Leafwing (Fountainea ryphea phidile)

On the many sandbanks I encountered lots of butterflies. Some not so easy to see when sitting on the ground like this. Here it’s sucking up minerals from capybara dung. Only when this species is flying you’ll see the beautiful colors on the upper side. Several species of butterflies simply refuse to open wings when […]

American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)

On the many sandbanks I encountered lots of butterflies. Some not so easy to see when sitting on the ground like this. Here it’s sucking up minerals from capybara dung. Only when this species is flying you’ll see the beautiful colors on the upper side. Several species of butterflies simply refuse to open wings when […]

Gulf fritillary (Agraulis vanillae)

During my visit I saw many species of butterflies on the many sandbanks. Capybaras and other mammals leave behind body fluids, feces and urine that attract butterflies and many other insects seeking salts and minerals. When the sandbanks become submerged this is no longer so easily accessible.

Juno Longwing (Dione juno)

During my journeys on the rivers I saw many species of butterflies on the sandbanks. Capybaras and other mammals leave behind body fluids, feces and urine that attract butterflies and many other insects seeking salts and minerals. When the sandbanks become submerged this is no longer so easily accessible.

Wallace’s Longwing (Heliconius wallacei)

Further up the Cristalino River, the first rapids and a small island with a great tree, Cristalino Jungle Lodge has a small farm and here I found several species of butterflies including this one. Thanks to Kim Garwood for assistance. She adds: “Yes, your H. wallacei is correct, based on your ventral, solid red lines […]

Heliconius sp

Further up the Cristalino River, the first rapids and a small island with a great tree, Cristalino Jungle Lodge has a small farm and here I found several species of butterflies including this one. I’ve been unable to identify this one as I’ve not found any resources with images that has the greenish spot with […]

Cristalino Jungle Lodge Lepidoptera 03

Further up the Cristalino River, the first rapids and a small island with a great tree, Cristalino Jungle Lodge has a small farm and here I found several species of butterflies including this one. Please help identify it – leave a comment.

Orcus Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus orcus)

Further up the Cristalino River, the first rapids and a small island with a great tree, Cristalino Jungle Lodge has a small farm and here I found several species of butterflies including this one. Thanks to Kim Garwood for identification.

Annulata Beauty (Colobura annulata)

Further up the Cristalino River, the first rapids and a small island with a great tree, Cristalino Jungle Lodge has a small farm and here I found several species of butterflies including this one.

Caricae Nymphidium (Nymphidium caricae)

On the path close to the new rooms at Cristalino Jungle Logde there was a large asteraceae bush in bloom, and naturally I found many wonderful species there. All small in size and from a distance seemingly inconspicuous. Up close it’s simply incredible beauty.

Serpia Crescent (Tegosa serpia)

On the path close to the new rooms at Cristalino Jungle Logde there was a large asteraceae bush in bloom, and naturally I found many wonderful species there. All small in size and from a distance seemingly inconspicuous. Up close it’s simply incredible beauty.

Derufata Nymphidium (Nymphidium derufata)

On the path close to the new rooms at Cristalino Jungle Logde there was a large asteraceae bush in bloom, and naturally I found many wonderful species there. All small in size and from a distance seemingly inconspicuous. Up close it’s simply incredible beauty.

Cachrus Nymphidium (Nymphidium cachrus)

On the path close to the new rooms at Cristalino Jungle Logde there was a large asteraceae bush in bloom, and naturally I found many wonderful species there. All small in size and from a distance seemingly inconspicuous. Up close it’s simply incredible beauty. Thanks to Kim Garwood for identification.

Eurema sp.

On the path close to the new rooms at Cristalino Jungle Logde there was a large asteraceae bush in bloom, and naturally I found many wonderful species there. This was the only shot I got of this species. Kim Garwood for identification.

Orsilochus Daggerwing (Marpesia orsilochus)

This individual was seemingly quite territorial, as I found it either on the ground or on the vegetation in the same area every day – just where the lower path to the new rooms at Cristalino Jungle Lodge begin. During my stay I found several butterfly hotspots around the buildings, but there were few places […]

Leucadia White (Melete leucadia)

This individual was infrequently accompanied by the beautiful Orsilochus Daggerwing which too was sucking up salts from the sand. This the beginning of the lower path to the new rooms at Cristalino Jungle Lodge..

Common Mylon (Mylon maimon)

Every day I enjoyed the many butterflies around my room, and this was the only of this species I encountered during my stay.

Tiger Crescent (Eresia eunice)

Every day I enjoyed the many butterflies around my room, and this was the only of this species I encountered during my stay. Also called Eunice Crescent. Thanks to Kim Garwood for identification.

Agathina Emperor (Doxocopa agathina)

Every day I enjoyed the many butterflies around my room and I was hoping this one would close its wings, as this species is more about open wings than closing them when on the ground. For a brief moment it did close the wings so I could see the underside.

Clymena Eighty-eight (Diaethria clymena peruviana)

One of several species diaethria found around Cristalino Jungle Lodge. This particular location is the “shipyard” of Cristalino Jungle Lodge (where the boats are taken on land), which was crowded with many different species.

Lavinia Emperor (Doxocopa lavinia)

The doxocopas look very similar to the adelphas out in the field, but when you see one with this amazing blue iridescence there are much less to choose from. This particular location is the “shipyard” of Cristalino Jungle Lodge (where the boats are taken on land), which was crowded with many different species. Luckily there […]

Cat’s-eye Sapphire (Lasaia arsis)

I’ve shot this several times before, but I just can’t help myself – and this shot I think really shows the splendor of this species!

Cynosura Eighty-eight (Callicore cynosura)

Unfortunately I was unable to get a photo of the upperside of the wings (dorsal), but the ventral (underside) is good enough for now. When observing a butterfly “hotspot” like this location, there are so many individuals I assume is the same species, and it’s hard to keep track of where each individual is moving […]

Linda Emperor (Doxocopa linda)

The doxocopas look very similar to the adelphas out in the field, as well as during identification at home. It’s like seeing the difference of two QR codes or barcodes! This is why I try to first of all determine how many individuals are in one location, and then to photograph each one for some […]

Clymena Eighty-eight (Diaethria clymena marchallii)

I had a hard time identifying this one, as all the photos available showed narrower black bands and white at the confluence of the numbers in contrast to black on mine. It appears that all races of clymena have a considerable variation! Thanks to Adrian Hoskins for identification clarification.

Astarte Eighty-eight (Callicore astarte)

Most focus on the underside of the wings, or ventral, but the dorsal (upperside) is in my eyes equally wonderful. The problem is of course that this is rarely displayed when stationary, so mostly luck or a large number of exposures can ensure a photo of the upper side. disturbed by my slow movements. This […]

False Numberwing (Paulogramma pyracmon)

Most focus on the underside of the wings, or ventral, but the dorsal (upperside) is in my eyes equally wonderful. The problem is of course that this is rarely displayed when stationary, so mostly luck or a large number of exposures can ensure a photo of the upper side. disturbed by my slow movements. This […]

Amazon Beauty (Baeotus aeilus)

This particular location is the “shipyard” of Cristalino Jungle Lodge (where the boats are taken on land), which was crowded with many different species. Luckily there were very few guest at the time I was at this hotspot, so the butterflies were more or less only disturbed by my slow movements. Many butterfly species, including […]

West Indian Buckeye (Junonia evarete)

Old and worn out, but still in good health as it was by no means sitting still when I repeatedly approached. Location was near one of the many dwindling pools of water.

White Peacock (Anartia jatrophae)

This was one of few species of butterflies I encountered in the fields of Pousada Xaraés.

Leuce Yellow (Pyrisitia leuce)

A small sandbank not far from the pier of Fazenda San Fransico was crowded with a great number of butterflies, and I was fortunate to disembark and get some shots, but not long enough as I was “disturbed” by the appearance of giant otters on the other side of the river. The one on the […]

Elathea Yellow (Eurema elathea)

A small sandbank not far from the pier of Fazenda San Fransico was crowded with a great number of butterflies, and I was fortunate to disembark and get some shots, but not long enough as I was “disturbed” by the appearance of giant otters on the other side of the river. Here’s one in flight. […]

Florida White (Glutophrissa drusilla)

A small sandbank not far from the pier of Fazenda San Fransico was crowded with a great number of butterflies, and I was fortunate to disembark and get some shots, but not long enough as I was “disturbed” by the appearance of giant otters on the other side of the river. Thanks to Kim Garwood […]

Godart’s White (Ganyra phaloe endeis)

A small sandbank not far from the pier of Fazenda San Fransico was crowded with a great number of butterflies, and I was fortunate to disembark and get some shots, but not long enough as I was “disturbed” by the appearance of giant otters on the other side of the river. The butterfly on the […]

Venusta Yellow (Pyrisitia venusta)

A small sandbank not far from the pier of Fazenda San Fransico was crowded with a great number of butterflies, and I was fortunate to disembark and get some shots, but not long enough as I was “disturbed” by the appearance of giant otters on the other side of the river. Also called venusta grass […]

Salpensa Sailor (Dynamine tithia salpensa)

There is a 9 km long trail (Poco Preto trail) from the main road that leads to the Iguaçu river, and for me it was butterfly heaven as I saw so many different species and in places also in groups. Thanks to Kim Garwood for identification.