Archive for 'Thraupidae'

Pampa Finch (Embernagra platensis)

An omnivore that knows how to harvest left overs from tourists, and this one was definitely accustomed to people as it was keeping a close eye on my lunch. It quickly turned its attention to a huge earthworm, and I wondered why and what it could possibly do with such a huge slippery tube of […]

Diademed Tanager (Stephanophorus diadematus)

On the way to the Itatiaia park entrance, towards Agulhas Negras, you’ll find the only sturdy man-made construction – a bridge painted in white. From here you have great views of the montane forest, the land below and the shrubs and small trees in the gully below in particular. Altitude: 2146 metres.

Brassy-breasted Tanager (Tangara desmaresti)

On the way to the Itatiaia park entrance, towards Agulhas Negras, you’ll find the only sturdy man-made construction – a bridge painted in white. From here you have great views of the montane forest, the land below and the shrubs and small trees in the gully below in particular. Endemic to Brazil. Altitude: 2146 metres.

Sayaca Tanager (Thraupis sayaca)

One of several species of birds seen in the garden of Hotel do Ype. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Magpie Tanager (Cissopis leverianus)

Only once did I see this species while at Hotel do ype. It definitely resembles a magpie! Altitude: 1021 metres.

Green-headed Tanager (Tangara seledon)

One of the spectacular birds seen around Hotel do Ype, and perhaps the most photographed. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Golden-chevroned Tanager (Thraupis ornata)

One of several species of birds seen in the garden of Hotel do Ype. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Black-goggled Tanager (Trichothraupis melanops)

One of several bird species seen in the gardens of Hotel do Ype. The hard to see yellow streak on the head. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Ruby-crowned Tanager (Tachyphonus coronatus)

One of several species of birds seen in the garden of Hotel do Ype. This is the female. Altitude: 1021 metres. Thanks to Fritz73 for identification of the male. Thanks to Andrew Whitehouse for identification of the female.

Silver-beaked Tanager (Ramphocelus carbo)

My room was in what could best compare with a cul-de-sac – at the very end of the new complex of Cristalino Jungle Lodge, and from my room I could watch all the various birds visiting this fruiting bush. Yet another visitor of this bush, albeit less frequent than for instance the short-billed honeycreeper.

Short-billed Honeycreeper (Cyanerpes nitidus)

My room was in what could best compare with a cul-de-sac – at the very end of the new complex of Cristalino Jungle Lodge, and from my room I could watch all the various birds visiting this fruiting bush. This honeycreeper was perhaps the most frequent visitor. Life’s easy as long as there’s fruit here, […]

White-shouldered Tanager (Tachyphonus luctuosus)

My room was in what could best compare with a cul-de-sac – at the very end of the new complex of Cristalino Jungle Lodge, and from my room I could watch all the various birds visiting this fruiting bush.

Turquoise Tanager (Tangara mexicana)

One of several colorful canopy-dwelling birds I encountered on the western canopy tower of Cristalino Jungle Lodge.

Greyish Saltator (Saltator coerulescens)

As I was slowly moving on the river of Fazenda San Francisco I noticed this bird together with a Black-capped Donacobius in a dense thicket on the riverside. If you don’t see it, learn about it’s wonderful song, as you’ll most likely hear it. Thanks to Niels Larsen for identification.

Yellow-billed Cardinal (Paroaria capitata)

As I was photographing the water plants I encountered this nesting yellow-billed cardinal. As you can see it’s panting in the hot evening sun and naturally it was reluctant to move away from the eggs, even though I got quite close before I noticed it.

Red-capped Cardinal (Paroaria gularis)

The fully mature adult.

Red-capped Cardinal (Paroaria gularis)

One couple was nesting underneath the pier. I first thought they roosted there during the nights, but one day I was swimming I noticed the nest. They seem to feel secured by the human activities to and fro, day in and out, but when I checked out the nest from above one day, it created […]