Archive for 'Birds'

Large-billed Tern (Phaetusa simplex)

Juveniles waiting for more free food, but are likely not getting much as they are old and strong enough to fly and get their own food. Soon the land they stand on will be submerged anyway and they will have to move on.

Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger)

The dry season is overtaken by the water, and the rivers are swelling day by day. Slowly the many sandbanks will be submerged and with them many birds relying on them will have a different landscape and a food supply that is harder to come by. In the dry season these sandbanks are full of […]

Bare-faced Curassow (Crax fasciolata)

After being hunted countless years by humans, the curassow is still nervous in the presence of humans even in protected areas. This one exhibited somewhat normal behavior despite my presence, but I was on a boat on the river and very far away so I was perhaps only closing in on the comfort zone.

Hyacinth Macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus)

This magnificent macaw species is recovering well, and some places in Pantanal you can see many of them. This is one very special couple though, as they have gradually become so accustomed to humans that they will come close as well as talk back when you call them. They were exceedingly talkative and babbled constantly […]

Itatiaia Spinetail (Asthenes moreirae)

I heard the song of this species during both my days on the plateau of Itatiaia National Park, but it’s really hard to see as it prefers to stay well hidden in the vegetation. I was in luck as this one was observing me out in the open from this lichen-clad berberis. Altitude: 2460 metres.

Pampa Finch (Embernagra platensis)

An omnivore that knows how to harvest left overs from tourists, and this one was definitely accustomed to people as it was keeping a close eye on my lunch. It quickly turned its attention to a huge earthworm, and I wondered why and what it could possibly do with such a huge slippery tube of […]

Blue-billed Black Tyrant (Knipolegus cyanirostris)

On the way to the Itatiaia park entrance, towards Agulhas Negras, you’ll find the only sturdy man-made construction – a bridge painted in white. From here you have great views of the montane forest, the land below and the shrubs and small trees in the gully below in particular. During my brief stay here I […]

Diademed Tanager (Stephanophorus diadematus)

On the way to the Itatiaia park entrance, towards Agulhas Negras, you’ll find the only sturdy man-made construction – a bridge painted in white. From here you have great views of the montane forest, the land below and the shrubs and small trees in the gully below in particular. Altitude: 2146 metres.

Brassy-breasted Tanager (Tangara desmaresti)

On the way to the Itatiaia park entrance, towards Agulhas Negras, you’ll find the only sturdy man-made construction – a bridge painted in white. From here you have great views of the montane forest, the land below and the shrubs and small trees in the gully below in particular. Endemic to Brazil. Altitude: 2146 metres.

Shear-tailed Grey Tyrant (Muscipipra vetula)

On the way to the Itatiaia park entrance, towards Agulhas Negras, you’ll find the only sturdy man-made construction – a bridge painted in white. From here you have great views of the montane forest, the land below and the shrubs and small trees in the gully below in particular. Altitude: 2146 metres.

Frilled Coquette (Lophornis magnificus)

For some strange reason I never got to see the gorgeous male, so this female is the only of the species I encountered during my stay at Hotel do Ype. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Sayaca Tanager (Thraupis sayaca)

One of several species of birds seen in the garden of Hotel do Ype. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Magpie Tanager (Cissopis leverianus)

Only once did I see this species while at Hotel do ype. It definitely resembles a magpie! Altitude: 1021 metres.

Chestnut-bellied Euphonia (Euphonia pectoralis)

One of several species of birds seen in the garden of Hotel do Ype. This is the male, and the only photo I got of it. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Green-headed Tanager (Tangara seledon)

One of the spectacular birds seen around Hotel do Ype, and perhaps the most photographed. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Rufous-collared Sparrow (Zonotrichia capensis)

This is a common bird throughout South America, and its characteristic song can be heard high up in the Andes. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Pale-breasted Thrush (Turdus leucomelas)

One of several species of birds seen in the garden of Hotel do Ype. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Saffron Toucanet (Pteroglossus bailloni)

Minutes ago I encountered three of them in a Secropia. Now they’re down to two and doing what really matters! As Itatiaia is one of the few strongholds of this species, all mating pairs are incredibly important! This species is near threatened, as its habitat, the fragmented remains of the Atlantic forest, is under constant […]

Short-crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus ferox)

Resembles Swainson’s flycatcher, but it has pinkish coloration on base of lower mandible (beak), this one is all black/dark. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Shiny Cowbird (Molothrus bonariensis)

One of several species of birds seen in the garden of Hotel do Ype. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Saffron Toucanet (Pteroglossus bailloni)

This group had a very brief stop on the moss and lichen clad Secropia trunk. A few minutes later I realize this is part of a mating competition. This species is near threatened, as its habitat, the fragmented remains of the Atlantic forest, is under constant pressure. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Golden-chevroned Tanager (Thraupis ornata)

One of several species of birds seen in the garden of Hotel do Ype. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Black-goggled Tanager (Trichothraupis melanops)

One of several bird species seen in the gardens of Hotel do Ype. The hard to see yellow streak on the head. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Ruby-crowned Tanager (Tachyphonus coronatus)

One of several species of birds seen in the garden of Hotel do Ype. This is the female. Altitude: 1021 metres. Thanks to Fritz73 for identification of the male. Thanks to Andrew Whitehouse for identification of the female.

White-throated Hummingbird (Leucochloris albicollis)

One of several species of hummingbird visiting the feeders at Hotel do Ype. Altitude: 1021 metres.

House Wren (Troglodytes aedon)

Very vocal and unafraid, but hard to get a good shot as the only background available was the grey clouds. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Brazilian Ruby (Clytolaema rubricauda)

One of several species of hummingbird visiting the feeders at Hotel do Ype. Just a tiny difference in angle, an the plumage seems all green and rather drab in comparison. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Planalto Woodcreeper (Dendrocolaptes platyrostris)

One of several species of woodcreepers seen in the garden of Hotel do Ype. Woodcreepers are hard to identify as they look very similar. This one is similar to the white-throated woodcreeper. Altitude: 1021 metres. Thanks to Fritz73 for clarification planalto vs white-throated: “It looks much better for Planalto to me. It seems too small […]

Dusky-legged Guan (Penelope obscura)

Several birds roam the garden of Hotel do Ype, and I also found one with chicks. In the dense forest they are much harder to see, but they are very much heard! In this posture the red dewlap is not visible, and and it’s not easy to see what kind of bird it is right […]

Picazuro Pigeon (Patagioenas picazuro)

I noticed this individual sitting on the cecropia branch, but it was just the first of a wave of birds. There’s quite a large group of this species in the garden of Hotel do Ype, and this is in most part due to the handouts from the bird-friendly hotel. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Slaty-breasted Wood Rail (Aramides saracura)

This individual had a rather peculiar behavior. It was seemingly oblivious to my presence and it preferred the open areas of the garden of Hotel do Ype to the denser forest. A female was keeping an eye on me from a distance and always under cover from vegetation, which was understandable as it had two […]

Maroon-bellied Parakeet (Pyrrhura frontalis)

A brief and only encounter of this species during my stay at Hotel do Ype,this was the only one in a passing group I managed to photograph. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Yellow-lored Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum poliocephalum)

This tiny bird is easier to hear than see, but in the garden of Hotel do Ype chances are much better than in the dense forest around. Also called grey-headed tody-flycatcher. Altitude: 1021 metres.

Green-billed Toucan (Ramphastos dicolorus)

Just minutes after my arrival at Hotel do Ype in Itatiaia I found this beautiful bird on its way to a fruiting tree nearby. The hotel is an excellent place to see birds at this elevation, and you can simply find a spot anywhere on the property and let the birds come, as I did […]

Silver-beaked Tanager (Ramphocelus carbo)

My room was in what could best compare with a cul-de-sac – at the very end of the new complex of Cristalino Jungle Lodge, and from my room I could watch all the various birds visiting this fruiting bush. Yet another visitor of this bush, albeit less frequent than for instance the short-billed honeycreeper.

Short-billed Honeycreeper (Cyanerpes nitidus)

My room was in what could best compare with a cul-de-sac – at the very end of the new complex of Cristalino Jungle Lodge, and from my room I could watch all the various birds visiting this fruiting bush. This honeycreeper was perhaps the most frequent visitor. Life’s easy as long as there’s fruit here, […]

White-shouldered Tanager (Tachyphonus luctuosus)

My room was in what could best compare with a cul-de-sac – at the very end of the new complex of Cristalino Jungle Lodge, and from my room I could watch all the various birds visiting this fruiting bush.

Muscovy Duck (Cairina moschata)

A boat on the Cristalilno river is an excellent way to see life in the reserve, and as in Pantanal there are muscovy ducks also here in the Cristalino Reserve.

Amazonian Trogon (Trogon ramonianus)

My only encounter of this species, and it was as usual with the trogons one in which the bird simply is perched on a branch looking – just looking. As with many sightings while in Cristalino Jungle Lodge, this one was also close to one of the buildings. So you don’t have to go on […]

White-bellied Parrot (Pionites leucogaster)

This was my one and only encounter of this species of parrot. This is just one of two individuals that found time to sit in this Brazil nut tree. This is typical of the encounters from a canopy tower, and although I encountered many bird species from the western canopy tower of Cristalino Jungle Lodge, […]

Turquoise Tanager (Tangara mexicana)

One of several colorful canopy-dwelling birds I encountered on the western canopy tower of Cristalino Jungle Lodge.

Yellow-browed Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum chrysocrotaphum)

This is such a tiny bird – around 9 cm in length, so close encounters are required to get any decent shots. This day I was in luck, as it chose this branch on one of the closets trees to the western canopy tower of Cristalino Jungle Lodge.

Paradise Jacamar (Galbula dea)

Paradise Jacamar (Galbula dea)

Definitely the most beautiful of the jacamars! From the western canopy tower of Cristalino Jungle Lodge I enjoyed not just this one, but also its mate. Unfortunately they never sat close enough to get them in one shot.

Spangled Cotinga (Cotinga cayana)

From the two canopy towers of Cristalino Jungle Lodge you have a fantastic bird’s eye view over the treetops, and you can see many of the canopy dwellers like this beautful cotinga. But as there are many trees in the jungle, it’s only by chance you’ll see birds on the treetops closest to the tower. […]

White-eyed Parakeet (Aratinga leucophthalmus)

Yet another of many species of parrots you may see on the grounds of Cristalino Jungle Lodge. This couple is eating off the spikelet, or the stem holding the coconuts! What nutritional value could it possibly hold, except lots of cellulose and fibres? They were quite persistent, and possibly will continue until the spikelet can […]

Black-fronted Nunbird (Monasa nigrifrons)

Commonly seen and heard around the houses of Cristalino Jungle Lodge. Not so common to see three together like this, though.

Dusky-billed Parrotlet (Forpus modestus)

Even though I was close to this tree and heard a lot of noise from these birds, it was hard to locate them, as their size and color is just like the leaves of the tree! Cristalino Jungle Lodge has many species of trees around the buildings that bear fruit, and thus you can get […]

Blackish Nightjar (Caprimulgus nigrescens)

Nightjars are naturally hard to see as they’re nocturnal, but you definitely hear them and if you use their sound you can often locate them with a flashlight. As Cristalilno Jungle Lodge has many buildings spread out, the many species of nightjars have excellent locations too roost during daytime, so take a close look when […]

Red-headed Manakin (Pipra rubrocapilla)

There are many trails leading into the primary forest from Cristalino Jungle Lodge, and I encountered these two manakins not far from the lodge. I just noticed a flash of red, and barely had time to set up the camera and shoot a few images before they both took off. I suspect this branch has […]

Black-eared Fairy (Heliothryx auritus)

Some birds are so well camouflaged that you can only see them when they move. This small bird blends perfectly against the high contrast of the greyish clouds and the foliage. This is from the western canopy tower of Cristalino Jungle Lodge.

Red-necked Aracari (Pteroglossus bitorquatus)

Cristalino Jungle Lodge has erected 2 canopy towers, and this is from the western one. This is the only way to see the life up here, and many species never venture to the ground. You have a fantastic view from here, but that too is a problem, as many birds are very far away and […]

Spix’s Guan (Penelope jacquacu)

There’s a particular palm with small fruits growing around the rooms of Cristalino Jungle Lodge, and they are irresistible to the guans. When in fruit, you’ll most definitely encounter the guans picking berries.

Red-throated Piping Guan (Pipile cujubi)

There are a lot of this species of palm in the garden of Cristalino Jungle Logde, so you can enjoy the different birds eating the fruits when you walk to and from your room. The small fruit is easy picking for all sized birds, and you’ll most likely encounter the perhaps largest of them all […]

Curl-crested Aracari (Pteroglossus beauharnaesii)

A bird with a “hairdo”! Unfortunately I did not have a close encounter of this species while in Cristalino Jungle Lodge, so you can just vaguely see the unusual curly head feathers in this photo.

Campo Flicker (Colaptes campestris)

The only species of woodpecker I encountered while at Pousada Xaraés. This was the second and last, and being the last few hours of my stay I think I should be satisfied. In fact it was only a few metres away from my room, so another proof you don’t have to go far to see […]

Rufous Hornero (Furnarius rufus)

As I was photographing plants I noticed the constant return of and foraging of this bird on the ground around me. Not at all nervous about me, and came very close on several occasions. Finally I found out where it was heading, and the nest was very close. It’s an amazing construction and is re-used […]

American Kestrel (Falco sparverius)

This is such a tiny bird of prey, and when they sit still in the rain like this, they’re easily missed, as no prey is making any warning calls. The rain has dampened a lot of activities, and this couple was observing and preening feathers with no intention of taking flight and not bothered by […]

Peach-fronted Parakeet (Eupsittula aurea)

My last day at Pousada Xaraés was a wet one, and a totally different setting than the previous two, which were sunny and hot. This group of parakeets look soaked and miserable, but they seemed to welcome the wetness as a different sort of having a bath. In the dry season they have to find […]

Hyacinth Macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus)

The sitting bird looks frightened in this photo, but this is all play and fun! This tree is often busy with younger birds (less than 7 years) as well as established pairs. You can see the branches have been chewed on, and they will be bitten to pieces much quicker than the process of decomposition. […]

White-backed Stilt (Himantopus melanurus)

It’s almost dark, and hard to see, and most of the birds are quiet now. This individual was standing by itself in the middle of the pond, while all the other birds were resting on its edge.