• Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: NIKON D4S
  • Taken: 14 December, 2014 16:07
  • Focal length: 700mm
  • ISO: 1600
  • Shutter speed: 1/640 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: NIKON D4S
  • Taken: 14 December, 2014 16:10
  • Focal length: 700mm
  • ISO: 1600
  • Shutter speed: 1/640 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: NIKON D4S
  • Taken: 14 December, 2014 16:07
  • Focal length: 700mm
  • ISO: 1600
  • Shutter speed: 1/800 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: NIKON D4S
  • Taken: 14 December, 2014 16:07
  • Focal length: 700mm
  • ISO: 1600
  • Shutter speed: 1/640 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: NIKON D4S
  • Taken: 14 December, 2014 16:10
  • Focal length: 700mm
  • ISO: 1600
  • Shutter speed: 1/640 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: NIKON D4S
  • Taken: 14 December, 2014 16:07
  • Focal length: 700mm
  • ISO: 1600
  • Shutter speed: 1/640 s

The oxbow lake at the Amazon Reaseach and Conservation Center holds enough fish to support ravenous giant otters, caimans, anhingas and neotropical cormorants.
The cormorant is a common bird throughout South America, and this oxbow lake is no exception, but sometimes there are moments where they might sit or do something unusual. In this posture it looks decapitated, and almost like a sculpture.

Neotropic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax brasilianus)
This is the position we love to see and photograph – drying its feathers.

Neotropic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax brasilianus)
A beautiful setting, but must be painful on the feet! In this dense jungle the only open spots are fallen trees and they are in high demand, so sitting here is a kind of luxury for those able to get there first and with a constant need for drying feathers in the sun.