• Aperture: ƒ/6.3
  • Camera: NIKON D3S
  • Taken: 28 November, 2012 16:27
  • Focal length: 700mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/250 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/6.3
  • Camera: NIKON D3S
  • Taken: 28 November, 2012 16:27
  • Focal length: 700mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/250 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/6.3
  • Camera: NIKON D3S
  • Taken: 28 November, 2012 16:27
  • Focal length: 700mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/250 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/6.3
  • Camera: NIKON D3S
  • Taken: 28 November, 2012 16:27
  • Focal length: 700mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/250 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/6.3
  • Camera: NIKON D3S
  • Taken: 28 November, 2012 16:27
  • Focal length: 700mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/250 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/6.3
  • Camera: NIKON D3S
  • Taken: 28 November, 2012 16:27
  • Focal length: 700mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/250 s

This bird is so well camouflaged that even though you know what to look for you will easily miss it. As a visitor you’ll need help from the locals, as their daily routines interact with its way of life, and the observant locals will at one time or another see it.

Long-tailed Potoo (Nyctibius aethereus)
In this case it was Vincente, the resident gardener/driver/mechanic/biologist/waiter/carpenter/guide. I was told it was an owl, and when Vincente told me to look at a tall stump I was lost, as where he seemed to point there was nothing, and I expected a clumpy (and large) owl. When my gaze finally reached the top of the stub I realized it was a potoo. Nesting!!

Vincente said this stump first was used for roosting, and after several months he noticed it was sitting on an egg.

An amazing bird visually, but the sounds are quite unusual as well, and the closest most people get to the bird.