• Aperture: ƒ/11
  • Camera: NIKON D3S
  • Taken: 1 December, 2010 16:12
  • Focal length: 24mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/1000 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/11
  • Camera: NIKON D3S
  • Taken: 1 December, 2010 16:26
  • Focal length: 24mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/500 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/11
  • Camera: NIKON D3S
  • Taken: 1 December, 2010 16:43
  • Focal length: 24mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/640 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/11
  • Camera: NIKON D3S
  • Taken: 1 December, 2010 16:12
  • Focal length: 24mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/1000 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/11
  • Camera: NIKON D3S
  • Taken: 1 December, 2010 16:26
  • Focal length: 24mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/500 s
  • Aperture: ƒ/11
  • Camera: NIKON D3S
  • Taken: 1 December, 2010 16:12
  • Focal length: 24mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/1000 s

The journey to Angel Falls begins only metres from where the Carrao River plunges into the huge Hacha Falls, and takes about 4 hours to reach the base of the Ayantepui from which Angel Falls originates. The transportation is a mix of old and new – with Yamaha outboards attached to a dug-out tree trunk! Your behind will become very sore after this journey, but it is 100% worth it! In the dry season, this trip will take 8 hours, if at all possible by boat!

The scenery is flat savanna the first hour or so, and on one side there is sad evidence of the Pyro indians never-ending play with fire. Huge areas of forest is but a graveyard of charred forest remains, while other areas have “recovered” to a forest state, but with a very monotonous vegetation. The other side of the river, that has not been burned, is incredibly much more diverse and even the colors of green is more diverse – for those who bother to look.

Boat trip to Angel Falls I
The size of the mountains grew as we got deeper into the wilderness.

Boat trip to Angel Falls I
A scenery that started out with a table mountain here and there, changed into what seemed like an impenetrable fortress of sheer cliffs! A dead end?

Boat trip to Angel Falls I
At some point there seemed to be very lilttle Pyro indian intervention fire-wise, and also the rapids become more frequent as we entered the Churun River.